How is garlic like Viagra? The answer is in The Truth about Food, from Discovery Health and the BBC

Far be it for me, a person striving to live a healthy lifestyle, to tell you to go watch TV. But I am. Telling you to watch TV. Because it is good for your health.

Don't believe me? Then let me explain.

And not only will you learn how garlic is, indeed, like Viagra but you'll even learn about an experiment that took a group of female vegetarian martial arts experts and fed them meat to see if it makes them fitter!

Starting at 8pm (ET/PT) tonight, Dr. Mehmet Oz is hosting what looks to be a fascinating look into food and diet in a new six-hour mini-series entitled The Truth about Food from the Discovery Health and the BBC.

How is garlic like Viagra?
Here are just some of the juicy things about food you will learn:
  • Fatter people have higher metabolic rates than thinner people, not the other way around.
  • Most people don't need to drink two liters of water every day—and coffee, tea and alcoholic drinks do count toward your fluid intake.
  • Garlic causes the body to release nitric oxide into the bloodstream. So does Viagra. (Garlic bread, anyone?)

How can you use food to be young, beautiful, healthy?
The episodes try to answer all these questions, and more. Here are the six episodes (hint, the last episode, finally!, looks at vegetarians):
  • How to Be Healthy. This episode follows nine fast-food junkies to an enclosure at a British zoo as they crunch their way through half a ton of raw fruits and vegetables in just 12 days. Learn how the bacteria in the gut also enjoy our food, and how it can lead to windy side effects.
  • How to Be Sexy. Can fruit and vegetables boost sperm quality and quantity? How might cheese help relieve the symptoms of PMS? And can you tell if a woman is attracted to you by the contents of her dinner plate?
  • How to Feed Your Kids. This episode provides a guide on how to open kids’ minds and mouths to new foods. Also, viewers will discover whether or not watching TV can trigger your child to put on pounds, and if sugar really makes kids hyperactive.
  • How to Be Slim. What foods keep you feeling fuller, longer? Does the speed of our metabolism really determine how fat we are?
  • How to Stay Young and Beautiful. Discover how the mere color of some foods can fight the aging process including how eating tomatoes can help stop the progression of wrinkles. Do detox diets work? And can drinking two liters of water a day can give you younger, healthier-looking skin?
  • How to Be the Best. A group of female vegetarian martial arts experts go back to eating meat to see if it makes them fitter and whether or not firefighters in Montana are better placed to lick the flames after licking their lips over snacks rather than the traditional three meals a day.

Fascinating food facts

Here's a taste, if you pardon the pun, of the really fascinating facts you will learn. These are tips for kids two years and older.
  • Carbohydrate-rich foods are a source of energy. Choose unrefined versions such as brown rice, wholemeal pasta, wholemeal or granary breads and breakfast cereals such as wheat biscuits, porridge and reduced-sugar muesli. These should provide about half your child’s energy intake.
  • Protein foods. Choose lean meats, fish, eggs, beans and pulses for growth and repair. (Of course, for us almost vegetarians, the emphasis would be on beans.)
  • Dairy foods provide calcium for healthy bones. Choose semi-skimmed milk, low or reduced-fat versions of yoghurt and cheese.
  • Fruit and vegetables provide vitamins and fibre. Aim to include as much as possible in your children’s diet. Frozen and canned count as well as fresh.
  • Fats and fatty foods; always use fats sparingly. Try to use more vegetable- based oils and spreads, rather than animal type fats. Keep fatty foods and snacks to a minimum.
  • Keep sugary foods such as cakes, biscuits, sweets and chocolate to a minimum: they should be used as occasional treat foods.

Companion book
Woo hoo for those of us that don't watch enough TV to warrant getting cable (that means me) because, even if you don't get the series, you can get the companion book of the same name. Of course, if any of you do watch the series and want to let me know about it, that would be awfully nice!

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