Vegetarian disaster planning

Did it ever occur to you that disaster planning might be a different sort of thing for a vegetarian family than for a non-vegetarian family?

Because us almost vegetarians live by stricter rules, our disaster planning kit has narrower parameters than those of our meat-eating friends. So, unless we are planning to give up our vegetarian lifestyle and stock up on canned tuna, stews, and other foods commonly recommended for emergency kits, then we need to plan as a vegetarian family for a disaster.

And I've got just the information you need to do so.

Disaster planning for the vegetarian family
I never considered that planning for an emergency kit for a vegetarian — almost or otherwise! — would be different than planning for a non-vegetarian. After all, we all need the same medical kit, the same amount of water, the same emergency supplies, and so on.

But where we differ is in our food needs. After all, none of us wants to stock caned meat, for example.

Below is a sample menu and a disaster planning shopping list for a vegetarian family of four (two adults, two kids). It doesn't require refrigeration, cooking, or water. This is not a life-long menu; merely an emergency one I got from a great article at The Vegetarian Resource Group.

Let's hope you never need it.

Vegetarian emergency sample menu
Breakfast
Cold cereal, 2 ounces
Raisins or other dried fruit, 1/4 cup
Soymilk, 8 ounces
Fruit juice, 8 ounces

Lunch
Peanut butter, almond butter, or soy-nut butter, 2 Tablespoons
Crackers, 12 or bread, 2 slices (Note: Mestemacher is one company that makes several packaged breads that are vegan and have a long shelf-life).
Unsweetened canned fruit, 7 ounces
Fruit juice, 8 ounces

Dinner
Bean spread (6 ounces of canned beans, mashed with spices - chili powder or cumin or garlic added)
Baked corn chips or crackers
Canned vegetable, 1 cup
Unsweetened canned fruit, 4 ounces
Graham crackers, 1 ounce
Soymilk, 8 ounces

Snacks
Roasted peanuts
Granola cereal
Wheat crackers

Disaster planning shopping list
This is based on the sample menu, above, and should last for three days.
  • 2 15- to 20-ounce boxes of cold ready-to-eat cereal
  • 1-pound can of raisins or other dried fruit (do not need to be refrigerated after opening)
  • 6 1-liter-size aseptic cartons of fortified soymilk
  • 6 half-gallon bottles of fruit juice (can remain at room temperature for a day after opening)
  • 1 1-pound jar of peanut butter, soy-nut butter, or almond butter
  • 1 1-pound package dry, crisp crackers (choose unsalted or lower-sodium versions to reduce thirst if water supply is limited) or 1-2 loaves packaged bread with a long shelf-life (at least 6 months from date of purchase)
  • 1 bag of baked corn chips
  • 3 29-ounce cans of unsweetened fruit
  • 3 15- to 20-ounce cans of unsweetened fruit
  • 6 15-ounce cans of cooked beans (like kidney beans, chickpeas, pinto beans, vegetarian baked beans, etc.)
  • 6 15-ounce cans of vegetables (choose unsalted or lower-sodium versions to reduce thirst if water supply is limited)
  • 1 box of graham crackers
  • 1 pound of granola (if purchased in bulk, store in tightly sealed glass container)
  • 3 12-ounce packages of whole-wheat crackers (choose unsalted or lower-sodium versions to reduce thirst if water supply is limited)
  • 12 ounces of nuts (if purchased in bulk, store in tightly sealed glass container)